Why gluten free diet is good

By | March 14, 2021

why gluten free diet is good

After being confined to health-food stores for years, gluten-free foods now show up everywhere. Based on little or no evidence other than testimonials in the media, people have been switching to gluten-free diets to lose weight, boost energy, treat autism, or generally feel healthier. Daniel A. Leffler, who is also an assistant professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School. Just 50 milligrams of the protein—about the amount in one small crouton—is enough to cause trouble. In people with celiac disease, gluten triggers an immune response that damages the lining of the small intestine. This can interfere with the absorption of nutrients from food, cause a host of symptoms, and lead to other problems like osteoporosis, infertility, nerve damage, and seizures. A related condition called gluten sensitivity or non-celiac gluten sensitivity can generate symptoms similar to celiac disease but without the intestinal damage. Not long ago, celiac disease was diagnosed by a process of elimination. Today it can be identified with a blood test for the presence of antibodies against a protein called tissue transglutaminase.

Despite the rarity of these diseases, there have been significant increases in the adoption of a gluten-free lifestyle and the consumption of gluten-free foods in the United States over the last 3 decades. The gluten-free diet is driven by multiple factors, including social and traditional media coverage, aggressive consumer-directed marketing by manufacturers and retail outlets, and reports in the medical literature and mainstream press of the clinical benefits of gluten avoidance. Individuals may restrict gluten from their diets for a variety of reasons, such as improvement of gastrointestinal and nongastrointestinal symptoms, as well as a perception that gluten is potentially harmful and, thus, restriction represents a healthy lifestyle. Emerging evidence shows that gluten avoidance may be beneficial for some patients with gastrointestinal symptoms, such as those commonly encountered with irritable bowel syndrome. However, high-quality evidence supporting gluten avoidance for physical symptoms or diseases other than those specifically known to be caused by immune-mediated responses to gluten is neither robust nor convincing. In fact, gluten avoidance may be associated with adverse effects in patients without proven gluten-related diseases. This article provides insight regarding gluten avoidance patterns and effects on patients without gluten-related diseases, and highlights concerns surrounding gluten avoidance in the absence of a gluten-mediated immunologic disease.

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Gluten diet is free good why

By Shannon Lewis, M. People with certain medical conditions have very good reasons to avoid gluten, the gluey, chewy protein found in wheat, kamut, spelt, rye, barley, triticale and malt. Here are the top three reasons on each side of the issue. You might ask, if I go gluten free and I feel better, why does it matter what my specific diagnosis might be? It matters for a couple of reasons. One is that a strict gluten-free diet goes way beyond simply avoiding bread, pasta and pizza — gluten hides, in trace amounts, in some surprising products. The second reason is that people with celiac disease need to be followed by a physician to monitor for signs of long-term associated problems. So find out first — then make an informed decision. Until then, if you think you may have one of these conditions, see your doctor for a complete evaluation. Three reasons to go gluten free and three reasons not to Going against the grain, part 1: By Shannon Lewis, M. Three good reasons to go gluten free To manage celiac disease.

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